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Long-term follow up analysis of nadroparin for hereditary angioedema. A preliminary report

Hereditary angioedema is caused by a C1-inhibitor deficiency. It is a life-threatening disease. Its management includes treating acute attacks, short-term prophylaxis, and long-term prophylaxis. We report our experience with nadroparin for the short-term prophylaxis and treatment of angioedema attacks. We indicated treatment with nadroparin 0.3-0.6 mL SC 20 min after the onset of prodromes, then every 8-12 h for 1 day; short-term prophylaxis with 0.3-0.6 mL 1 h before a triggering event and then every 12-24 h for 1 more day. For children, treatment included 0.3 mL SC 20 min after the onset of prodromes, then every 12-24 h for 1 day; short-term prophylaxis was 0.3 mL 1 h before a triggering event and 1 more dose after 24 h. For the treatment, a complete response was considered when nadroparin totally stopped an acute attack within 2 h after injection. Partial response was considered if after 2 h analgesics and/or other therapy were required. Failure was established if after 4 h no response was obtained and fresh frozen plasma and other in-patient measures were required. For short-term prophylaxis, only complete responses and failures were considered. We included 29 adults and 5 children. Functional C1-inhibitor and C4 levels rose after nadroparin. We recorded 256 treatments (89.8% complete responses, 8.2% partial responses, and 1.9% failures), and 102 short-term prophylactic regimens (90.2% complete responses, and 9.8% failures). We found 38 mild adverse events without severe hemorrhagic episodes. If our results are reproduced subsequently, nadroparin may be an alternative for the treatment and short-term prophylaxis of angioedema attacks.Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1567576911000786 (small fee)

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